The 5 Types of Procrastinators & How You Can Overcome!

By Roz Jones

There are mainly 5 common types of procrastinators. Determine which one you relate to the most & how you can overcome it.

  • The Perfectionist.
    Don’t let your obsession with details take up all your time. Instead, be clear about the purpose of the tasks and assign a time limit to work on each one. This pushes you to stay focused and finish within the desired time. 

    The perfectionist pays too much attention to making every perfect. They are afraid to start; afraid they won’t get every detail right. They can get stuck during the process of a task because they are too scared to continue.
  1. The Dreamer.
    The dreamer enjoys making plans more than taking action. They are often highly creative but find it difficult to finish the work.

    Stop yourself from being carried away by your endless creative ideas by getting your feet on the ground with specific goals based on the SMART system. Set the goal, break it into small tasks you can take action on and then follow through. When you have ideas pop into your head, jot them down to revisit later.
  1. The Avoider.
    The avoider is a worrier. They are too scared to attempt tasks they think they can’t handle. Instead, they would rather put off doing the work than be judged by others when they make mistakes.

    Focus on the worst task first. Spend your morning hours working on what is the most challenging to you. This gives you a feeling of having achieved something and helps build momentum for the rest of the day. Avoid checking emails first thing every day. And break your tasks into smaller sub-tasks.
  1. The Crisis-Maker. 
    The crisis-maker is someone who deliberately puts work off until the last minute. To them, deadlines (or crises) are exciting and they believe they work best when they are under pressure of a deadline.

    Realize that you are not doing your best work by waiting until the last minute. Instead, work on the project a little at a time. Try using the Pomodoro technique where you focus on working in short, focused bursts then give yourself a short break before starting again.
  1. The Busy Procrastinator.
    The busy procrastinator has trouble prioritizing tasks. They are the fussy ones who have too many tasks or refuse to work on what they think as unworthy of their skills. They don’t know how to pick the task that is the highest priority and best for them, so they simply put off making any decision.

    Set your priorities in the right order. Important tasks take priority over urgent ones. Urgent doesn’t always mean it’s important. Important tasks are the ones that will add value to your expected outcome.

Procrastination doesn’t have to always get you down. Did you find out the type of procrastinator you are? I hope you use these tips to continue kicking your procrastination habits to the curb as you prepare for the new year!


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